Connect with us

Blockchain Technology

5 Ways Blockchain Technology Can Help Africa’s Development

Published

on

blockchain technology can help Africa

Blockchain technology has garnered substantial global media attention since the beginning of this year. This trend can also be witnessed in the African media landscape who has covered this new technology intensively. In as much as the blockchain may not be the much-awaited savior in all aspects of human life (contrary to what some ‘over-zealots’ preach), there are several features and functions inherent with the technology that can go a long way to better the lives and societal systems of mankind.

In fact, there are several solutions that blockchain technology has to offer, which is desperately needed by the African continent to better the lives of its citizens and to increase the economic and social development of African nations.

Remittances

Blockchain technology through the use of cryptocurrencies or tokenized fiat currency can help reduce and even possibly eliminate the bottlenecks that pertain to traditional money transfer systems. The issue of delayed transactions with platforms such as SWIFT, Western Union, Money Gram and some mobile payment systems can be solved using blockchain technology as it is able to provide higher transaction speed than its peers. With blockchain, thousands of dollars can be sent from one point of the globe to another within minutes or even seconds. Additionally, the costs of these blockchain-based money transfers tend to be significantly lower than traditional systems.

By the end of 2015, it was estimated that yearly remittances of Africans in the diaspora back to the continent stood at a figure of $35.2 billion. The associated cost of these transfers, however, made up about 10 percent of the amount. This meant that a significant amount of those monies ended up with third-party service providers instead of getting to intended beneficiaries. Blockchain-based money transfers should have significantly lower fees and are peer-to-peer, which means that third-party institutions that rake out a significant chunk of the remittance can be eliminated since money can be sent directly from the

Blockchain-based money transfers should have significantly lower fees and are peer-to-peer, which means that third-party institutions that rake out a significant chunk of the remittance can be eliminated since money can be sent directly from the diasporan to his or her beneficiary.

Identity Management

The problem of proper identification and citizen data management seems to be a general debacle with most countries on the continent. Countries like Ghana and Nigeria embark on a regular vicious cycle of public sector payroll purging all in “efforts” to weed out “ghost names”. This issue can be effectively addressed if blockchain technology were to be applied.

Blockchain technology can neither be altered, manipulated nor can its data be erased as such its implementation in solving the issue of citizen identity in Africa seems like a very plausible option that should be considered by governments. By making use of cryptographic hashing and blockchain technology, individual citizens can be identified by a set of codes that will be almost impossible to hack due to the decentralised nature of the technology.

For example, US-based blockchain startup Civic leverage Bitcoin’s public blockchain to deliver identity management solutions for business and individuals. African governments can leverage the services of such players to not only solve their pestering public wage bill discrepancies, but it can be escalated to help address issues of citizen authentication and identification.

The Electoral Process

On a continent where election results and outcomes are often disputed, it is increasingly becoming important to have full-proof electoral systems to help keep the sanity of societies and communities. There have been several instances where disputed election results have led to violent agitations causing loss of lives and properties.

In the last elections that happened in The Gambia, for example, it was observed that voters made use of stones to cast their ballots, a process of this nature may not only be rife with inefficiencies, but it also goes against the ethic of privacy that should generally characterise an electoral process. Voters were expected to drop their stone ballots in containers for aspiring candidates much to the visibility of other voters and officials.

Blockchain’s public and transparent nature can be applied to electioneering just as with the case of citizen identification. Voters will be able to electronically cast their votes faster and results could be collated almost immediately with little or no disputes since the platform is practically immune to manipulation and data on it can be generally regarded as valid because the eligibility of citizens by way of age and other criteria can be assured.

Land Title Registration

The case of land and its attendant ownership issues is an albatross around the necks of most landlords and aspiring land owners in Africa. Blockchain technology comes in handy to help address this challenge and in fact, some African companies like Bitland are already contributing their quota in this regard.

With the power of blockchain technology, Bitland aims to streamline and automate the entire process of land registration to provide a better system of records immune to human manipulations and shenanigans. Bitland helps existing and aspiring land owners as well as other stakeholders with the services of surveying and recording of deeds onto Bitshares blockchain.

Transparent Government Expenditure

Going against the grain of what is popular in the news about crypto-transactions being shrouded in secrecy, more often than not the opposite is the case. Bitcoin transactions are actually available on a public ledger and can be viewed by all. This presents an opportunity for unrivaled transparency and can be translated into the system of governance in Africa.

Being a continent that is plagued with government officials allegedly misappropriating public funds, it would be a milestone for African nations (as well as Western nations for that matter) to introduce blockchain technology into track government spending.

The introduction of blockchain technology into governance would help the ordinary citizen track government spending and know what their taxes are being used for. The blockchain would be able to fight public sector corruption way more effectively than any legislative instrument enacted by parliaments would. Government spending could be followed in real-time and past transactions could be quickly called-up without the need to wait for annual audit statements before resource misappropriations can be uncovered.

Governments across the globe are increasingly off-loading aspects of their operations onto the blockchain and it is only fair and progressive that African governments follow suit for the ultimate benefit of their citizens and posterity.

Continue Reading

Blockchain Technology

mCoin: An Inclusive Cryptocurrency That Can Be Accessed Without Internet

Published

on

mCoin

The London-based technology company ONEm is launching mCoin, a new cryptocurrency that can be accessed outside the scope of the Internet. The digital currency aims to reach billions of people around the globe through offline channels, such as mobile phones, and is powered by ONEm’s global and scalable platform.

An Offline Cryptocurrency

mCoinONEm‘s mCoin is a digital currency that is based on the original bitcoin blockchain. What makes it unique, however, is that it will allow people with limited or no access to the Internet to take advantage of blockchain services. Users can open SMS virtual wallets where they can store, send or receive mCoins offline using a mobile phone. The cryptocurrency can be traded through SMS messages or USSD codes which is fairly uncomplicated when compared to online trading on peer-to-peer exchanges, according to the company.

Since users will be accessing mCoin offline, they can enjoy an extra layer of security against threats of hacking and malware. In addition, the cryptocurrency will be integrated to existing ONEm social and business applications like Sweb, Market Place, mCatalogue just to name a few, which rely on Internet, SMS or Voice messages. However, the biggest innovation would be the ability of people to mine mCoins offline.

Mining is is the process through which network participants contribute their computing power to verify and process transactions on a cryptocurrency network. Mining is necessary to keep the network secure and operational. For their service, miners are rewarded with new coins for their effort. This is usually done online through specialized mining hardware or in the case of some coins, through CPU’s. mCoin operators plan to roll out ‘pseudo-mining’, which is a proof of work that enables people to earn coins through activities they perform on the ONEm platform.

ONEm’s African Focus

Founded in 2012, ONEm is a technology company that has developed a platform that provides interactive access to information and content through SMS and voice. The company aims to establish its presence in Africa by solving some of the common challenges faced in the continent. These include connecting people who have no access to financial services, providing information sharing services that have previously been out of the reach of many, and improving the user experience when accessing digital services.

Since SMS is a standard feature for nearly all mobile devices, mCoin expects to scale rapidly through a large volume of users and leveraging strategic partnerships. The platform has partnered with Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) in Africa to deliver interactive SMS and Voice services that can allow people to access news, podcasts, and information by simply typing a shortcode. Small enterprises can benefit from a digital currency that allows them to access new markets and an easier way to receive payments.

In addition, users can use mCoin to participate in loyalty and purchasing schemes in the ecosystem without the need for a smartphone, just a simple text or audio message. Interestingly, African governments and local organisations can make use of mCoin’s underlying SMS accessible blockchain technology to provide valuable services for people who may not have access to online services.

Christopher Richardson, the CEO of ONEm states in press release,

“It is exciting to see so many people who share in our vision for an inclusive Cryptocurrency outside of the domain of the Internet. People from all over the world are participating in mCoin Pre ICO and taking advantage of the attractive bonus packages now available as they see tremendous high growth potential of a cryptocurrency that can reach this very big un-tapped market”

Continue Reading

Blockchain Technology

Interpol and VoguePay to Launch Blockchain-based Crime Control Platform in Nigeria

Published

on

interpol voguepay

Online payments provider VoguePay and the International Criminal Police Organisation (Interpol) are set to launch a blockchain-based crime control platform in Nigeria.

Crime Control on the Blockchain

The crime control platform, which will be called interPort, will obtain information and manage stakeholder involvement and crime reporting.

“The partnership with VoguePay will help the agency to increase the safety of Nigerians, and to protect the economy while enabling citizens and businesses to comfortably embrace available technologies to grow their businesses, increase their profits, and create more jobs,” Interpol Commissioner of Police in Nigeria, Olushola K. Subair, stated.

Thanks to its experience in payments security and blockchain implementation, VoguePay will enable Interpol to increase citizen engagement and cooperation with partner networks to curb crime in Nigeria.

“Blockchain technology is the next evolution in identity management and that by leveraging it, Interpol is now better positioned to offer cross-agency data and biometric management,” Michael Simeon, CEO VoguePay, said.

Crime in Nigeria

Criminal activities in Nigeria range from kidnappings and robberies to contract killings and terrorism.

The Nigeria 2017 Crime & Safety Report by the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) states: “Crime is a risk throughout the country with significant terrorism threats, especially in northern Nigeria. Boko Haram is suspected of or has claimed responsibility for most of the terrorist activity in Nigeria.”

For instance, the Lagos State and Federal Capital Territory recorded a total of 58,566 crimes in 2016. With such high crime levels, the partnership between Interpol and VoguePay could be a step in the right direction to make Nigerians feel more assured that perpetrators will be caught and charged for their crimes.

Continue Reading

Blockchain Technology

Kenya’s Capital Markets Authority Issued Warning Against Initial Coin Offerings

Published

on

initial coin offerings kenya

Kenya’s Capital Markets Authority has issued a public warning against initial coin offerings (ICOs) in an attempt to warn Kenyans about the risks involved in investing in newly issued digital tokens.

“It is notified for general information that the CMA has not as of this date, approved any initial coin offering. The ongoing offerings are unregulated and speculative investments with considerable risk to the investor […] ,” the notice reads.

The risks cited by the CMA include a heightened potential for fraud, cross-border distribution risks, information asymmetry, and liquidity risks.

Currently, two Kenya-based cryptocurrency projects that are conducting ICOs include Nurucoin and UwezuCoin. Both, however, have been criticized by members of the local cryptocurrency community and it is unlikely that these projects will raise a notable amount of funds during their token sales.

It is also important to note that the current regulatory environment in Kenya is – for the most part – anti-cryptocurrencies but very much pro-blockchain. This is also reflected in the CMA’s statement, which says:

“CMA is cognisant of the importance of FinTech and the benefits that can be derived from leveraging blockchain technology and is willing to work with interested parties through the already established Sand Box model for purposes of supporting innovative FinTech products in a controlled and safe environment.”

The most prominent African token sale to date has been the SureRemit ICO, which managed raised over $7 million for the non-cash remittance platform. In 2018, several African blockchain startups are expected to launch token sales to fund their operations. Whether the Kenyan financial regulator’s warning will deter Kenyans from investing in these ICOs remains to be seen.

For investors, it is extremely important to conduct thorough research into a blockchain project before investing any funds as the barriers to entry for launching a token sale are extremely low and there are many scammers out there looking to prey on newcomers to the crypto asset investment space.

Continue Reading

Popular Posts